Lettera Padre June 2017

Lettera Padre June 2017

 Carissimi confratelli
 


 

WAKE UP THE WORLD…. OF THE ASCRIBED
Let us wake up the world of the Ascribed… with the melody of a hymn to charity!
Let us awaken it, and provide it with nourishment, as the Angel awoke and nourished the prophet Elijah: “Arise and eat, because the journey is too great for you” (1 Kings 19, 7).
The Title
The title is borrowed from Pope Francis’ invitation to the Major Superiors in the audience of 29th November 2014: “My expectation is that you will awake the world, since the specific charism of the consecrated life is prophecy”.
During the following months Pope Francis mentioned Rosmini on three occasions, each time calling him a prophet, who, moved by love for the Church, desired to heal her wounds. From the words used by Pope Francis, we can guess that he was probably meditating on the book, “The Five Wounds”. Many others have seen in Rosmini a “prophet”: obedient, persecuted, far-seeing, and anticipating many of the themes of Vatican II. Rosmini inserted prophetic insights even in the Constitutions of the Society of Charity, which over a period of time have been fulfilled or are about to be fulfilled.
First Section
The union of good people
“Greet Prisca and Aquila… greet Epaenetus… greet Mary…” (Rom. 16, 1-27). Paul mentions 29 persons, to whom he adds names of families and groups of Christians who gathered at their houses. I always find impressive this long list of Paul’s co-workers. Rosmini too, as a prophet and apostle of love, delights in increasing, through Ascription, the number of those who work for truth and love.
The variety of persons
The variety of the persons who make up the Society of Charity is indicated in the title of the second chapter of the Constitutions, which follows the chapter on The End of the Society. The Society/Institute of Charity is constituted by Presbyters, Coadjutors – priests and brothers – Adoptive Sons (diocesan priests, religious, laymen), and Ascribed (bishops, diocesan priests, and lay-people both male and female). The Sisters of Providence (Rosminian Sisters) also live and share, in their own special way of belonging, in its charism. The expressions “Society of Charity” and “Institute of Charity” are equivalent in meaning (see Rules of the Ascribed, 2009, p 3). Today, in the Church, religious men and women use the expression Charismatic Family to indicate the people who participate as associates in the same charism; for quite a while we have been using the expression Rosminian Family.
Rosmini had already envisaged that we accept anyone who has been sent to the Society of Charity. This is what he wrote in referring to himself: “As the said priest found himself obliged, in so far as the matter depended from him, not to reject anyone who had been sent by God to the Society of Charity and who could contribute to the fulfilment of its end, he felt the need to distribute them into different groups, to make room for as many of them as possible” (Second Description of the Society of Charity, in its organisation; see Charitas, March 2017, p. 42)
“What may appear to our cultural prejudice a dated, undemocratic division into classes (Presbyters, Coadjutors, Adoptive sons, Ascribed) was, in the depths of his Christian heart, the greatest sign of openness and fatherhood, as a Christian and as a consecrated person, directed at welcoming and accommodating everyone in the banquet of Gospel perfection, in their variety of abilities, gifts, specific vocations, different degrees of knowledge and of virtue. The gifts the Lord grants to each of us are indications of tasks, duties, precious and multiform ministries, which are not valuable in themselves, but become such because God wills them. Rosmini respected all gifts because he respected persons in their specific vocations, and it was a matter of obedience to their Father and Lord” (Sr Maria Michela Riva, Charitas, ibid. p. 44)
Our birth: a new Institute, constituted by religious, diocesan priests, and the faithful lay people.
The first professions and Ascriptions were made at Domodossola in 1839: “On the 25th of March, at seven in the morning, after sending out the people from the Church of JESUS on the Cross, beautifully prepared for the joyful occasion, the doors were closed and only the brethren of the Institute remained together with five externs who were going to be enrolled as Ascribed”. They were, in all, 15 religious and 5 Ascribed. The Ascribed present for the occasion were two priests and three laymen; to their number we can also add three priests and two laymen who were not present. At Spetisbury, at the same hour, Frs. Luigi Gentili and John-Baptist Pagani made their profession, while six others made their profession at Prior Park. The Ascribed were, therefore, an integral part of the Institute right from the birth of the Institute (see Pagani-Rossi, Vita di A. Rosmini, Vol. II, p. 2-5). On 1st July 2017, at Cardiff, there will be a presentation of a book on the first Rosminians in England, Wales, and Ireland written by Fr Michael Hill.
1927: the birth of a new Periodical
Nearly 90 years later, Fr General Bernardino Balsari came to the conclusion that it had become urgent to move forward and gave his approval to the birth of a new Periodical entitled, CHARITAS. “Ascription in the Institute has never been fostered in a very active way. Although we do have a modest number of Ascribed, they lack that unity and organisation as a body which is a condition and principle of life. They are single individuals
spread widely but always isolated, without that real bond of fellowship among them which is the result of constant communication… This is the reason for our decision to publish a modest journal or Periodical of the Ascribed, which will serve as a means of deepening their knowledge of the nature and purpose of Ascription, as well as of fostering a loving exchange among them and with the Institute, keeping alive in them the true spirit of Ascription, and helping them to find in the Ascription a stimulus to do good and to engage in the sanctification of their own soul, by loving God and neighbour… The Periodical will remind you that you are part of our Institute” (Charitas, January 2003, p. 2-3).
It is our belief that Charitas, over the past 90 years, has indeed fulfilled its task. We have experienced the fruit of personal holiness in its readers, especially at the time of the process of Beatification of Rosmini. Many have written to us about the holiness of Rosmini, and others have made us aware of healings and supernatural graces which could be attributed to the intercession of Father Founder.
A renewed approach to commitment and organisation for Ascription and for local Sodalities.
As far as the organisation is concerned our task is mainly to check and bring up to date the procedures of the various groups in line with the written rules. We have an English edition of the Rules of the Ascribed (1992), and an Italian edition (2009) which has only a few slight changes. We can, therefore, act accordingly. It is possible that we may witness something new, inspired by the Holy Spirit and by love which always urges us on. For the time being, let us repeat with conviction, “Let us lift up our hearts! We have lifted them up and consecrated them to the Lord!”
Sodalities
Fr Founder included, as part of the Ascription, the creation of Sodalities.
“The one form of Sodality, which is mentioned and suggested in the Constitutions of the Ascribed, is the Sodality of the Oratory. No other Sodality is mentioned, since, being the needs of the faithful and of the Dioceses different, it is desirable that such Sodalities arise spontaneously, according to places and circumstances, and under the inspiration of the Holy Spirit who moves the hearts of the Ascribed to one form of charity rather than another. The formation of a Sodality requires only the following: let the Ascribed who wish to constitute themselves into a Sodality write their own Constitutions and seek the approval of Father General. It is the responsibility of Fr General to approve the Constitutions, to issue a decree, and to found the Sodality” (EC. VIII, 514).
This is something which we ought to promote in our Ascription programme. It is not a question of distinction or of praise, but of useful development, since a way of being can naturally generate a way of acting. Ascription can develop and operate actively at a local level, and we give this new way of being the very “Rosminian” name of Sodality.
Ascription should generate Sodalities; if it doesn’t, it would deprive itself of concrete possibilities for expressing itself to its full potential, and thus reaching fully its purpose. This is what Fr Founder wrote: “Once Ascription has become a reality in its wider organisation, and has begun to generate Sodalities, it will be possible to experience it in all its goodness. General Ascription is more passive than active, since it aims at fostering devotion, piety, and purity of conscience. Sodalities, on the other hand, are active, they are the untiring hands used by Ascription in works of charity towards its neighbour. In order to achieve such great good, it is necessary that the central source of Ascription, which is the Institute of Charity, of which Ascription is a complementary part, should be strong in holiness and in that wisdom in governing which is communicated by the Spirit of our Lord” (EC. VII, 539).
We have at present the “Sodality of the Consecrated Ascribed of the Institute of Charity” which was approved ad experimentum, together with the Rules of the Ascribed in 2009. Their Rule is explained in five paragraphs. However, it does not have the characteristics of a local Sodality, as there are outlined in the words of Fr Founder quoted above. In 1846, at the Sacra di San Michele, there was a “Sodality of the Missionaries of the Institute of Charity”, with the agreement of the Bishop of Susa. It was constituted by Rosminian religious and by Ascribed diocesan priests.
It is important to look carefully at what Rosmini says in the words quoted above. It is useful to dwell in depth over two clear indications: Sodalities within the general Ascription are like the hands in reference to the arms. Moreover, they arise in various places urged by the inspiration of the Holy Spirit in response to the circumstances through which the needs of the faithful and the inclinations of the Ascribed are made manifest. They require the approval of Fr General. This is the track which we should follow.
There is another expression which we should not miss: “Once Ascription has become a reality in its wider organisation, and has begun to generate Sodalities, it will be possible to experience it in all its goodness”. We cannot say that we have reached the level of organisation which Rosmini had in mind. We ought to desire it and promote it. It can be said that the full organisation of Ascription is only one among the many needs of the Institute, and this is true. Nonetheless we ought not to neglect the “great amount of goodness” deriving from Ascription. There are always possible opportunities.
One example
In 2008, a diocesan priest founded the “Cultural Group Antonio Rosmini”, at the age of 86. Many of its members had the opportunity of deepening their knowledge of Rosminian spirituality, and visited often the Communities of Rovereto, Calvario, Stresa, taking part in many initiatives and events, and in spiritual retreats. At the end, they became Ascribed linked to the Community at Calvario. They are a section of the Cultural Group, but if we consult the periodical “Quaderni Rosminiani” [Rosminian Pamphlets], we become aware of their deep knowledge of Rosminian spirituality, their involvement in the life of the church, both at the universal level and at the local level, and their particular attention to intellectual charity in relation
to the problems of their geographical area. It is our duty to acknowledge and to nurture the little shoot grown in such brief time.
Section Two
Questions and challenges
What are the convictions which are essential to a true Christian and a true Rosminian? What is the source of the power in the heart of a saint, of a founder, that is able to draw to itself hundreds of brothers and sisters? What are the spiritual affections that bind together the brethren of religious communities? What kind of order keeps together different people in religious Institutes? What is the source of the “think big” typical of Rosminians? And of the “big heart”? Who is truly a Christian according to Rosmini? What are the foundations which we can use as stepping stones towards living and promoting Ascription?
Rosminian stepping stones towards living and promoting Ascription
In this section we shall consider some elements of the relational structure of the Christian and of the universal and associative nature of the Church, and, as a consequence, of the Institute. I think it could be advantageous to mention what Rosmini has to say in his book, “About the Author’s Studies”, which is very much valued as the highest synthesis of his journey. Professor Ottonello says of the book: “The book is Rosmini’s philosophical autobiography and a programmatic manifesto, written with exceptional and concise clarity”. As we reflect on the book, we become aware of its “authority”, that is, of the originality of his proposal of an all embracing charity, triniform in nature, and developed in the Church, for the sake of the whole of humanity. Let us reflect carefully on the following passages from the book. Size wise they are small, but they are extremely powerful, similar to what we find in the Maxims of Christian Perfection.
Three great recommendations from Rosmini and three attractive images: the chariot, the star, the bunch of grapes.
The possibility of the benign influence of a person can be explained in many ways. JESUS chose three ways: He is the Way, the Truth, and the Life of the Christian. Rosmini draws a great impetus from JESUS’ words and applies them to us. The divine life passes on to us from JESUS Himself, and the fire of the Burning Bush comes to us transforming us into light of the world. “Those who believe in Him and in what he said are transformed, so to speak, into other Christs: the Word is also the way in them, indicating what must be done, and the truth, endowing them with power to implement it. In addition, He is also life” (About the Author’s Studies, n. 99).
a) The chariot and the charioteer for a unique and marvellous journey
The image of the way was appealing during Rosmini’s time, as it is today. He had just returned to Stresa after his travels to Rome and other places in 1848-49. Images of his journeys in horse-drawn carriages were still very much alive in his memory. He imagines that to lead man on the right road we have much better reins than the external ones: we possess interior reins, within ourselves: the Word, the light of the soul, holds in his hands from within man all his faculties: “JESUS, our Teacher, is so different in nature from mankind that he is able to enter and take his place, as it were, in the very soul of the disciples and there direct and even stimulates by his own Spirit all the disciples’ powers, like a charioteer from his chariot” (About the Author’s Studies, n. 101).
One of Rosmini’s invocations, very rich in meaning, was: “O my Head, my Life, and my God take full control of all my faculties” (2nd February 1851). This invocation was an echo of Rosmini’s book, About the Author’s Studies, which he was about to publish. Let us make use of it often.
b) The Christian is like a star, attracting others
The presence of JESUS, the Way, the Truth, and the Life, in the hearts of believers has two joyful consequences for the whole of humanity.
“Firstly, mankind is truly organised into a single body, with a single divine head. This satisfies our deep, mysterious longing to ensure the unification of the species. Secondly, each individual who has Christ within him is ennobled as a kind of end of the universe and becomes, as it were, a centre of his own to which all other things are referred. The disciple is like a star in the immensity of space, exerting its pull, as astronomers believe, on every other heavenly body” (About the Author’s Studies, n. 102).
This image is relevant today, and is been used by Pope Francis in relation to the Church, which must bring the good news by “attraction”.
“O my God, bring it about that my limitations may never be opposed to your infinite essence” (13 December 1852). Rosmini’s prayer is that he may never resist the divine attraction which keeps him in his orbit.
c) Those who are joined to the divine Word are like a bunch of grapes
If the first image called to our mind the dimension of reining in all our faculties, and the second image considered the strength of the pull of attraction, the third image, in its turn, concentrates on expansion, on the power to reach out. This third image opens our mind to universal charity. Charity contains the spirit of proselytism or, in other words, the principle of association. “That which we have seen and heard we proclaim also to you, so that you may have fellowship” (1 John 1, 3).
It is the divine Word who associates human beings with himself:
“Those who are joined to the Word are like a bunch of grapes, as it were, in which all the grapes together belong to the same bunch and absorb the life-giving sap. The same can be said of charity. By its nature charity is union, the most perfect and sublime union which, in some way, can be called “unification”. It is no wonder, then, that mankind should feel, as soon as charity was brought into the world, an unusual need to associate. Within humanity, a movement arose, tending constantly to produce new, more or less perfect associations. The greatest society is the Catholic universal Church. The shepherds are at the same time teachers and priests because truth and charity are two forms of the same divine good” (About the Author’s studies, n. 107).
Each Christian possesses his own light of truth and his own fire of charity
“Light of truth and fire of love” was the motto of the bi-centennial celebrations of the birth of Antonio Rosmini. After nearly 20 years, it would be appropriate to bring the motto back to our attention.
The words of the motto deserve to be quoted in full. Rosmini’s assertions are so strong that after reading them no one should be left with any doubt about the right of everyone to participate fully in the life of the Church. The same can be said about the participation in the life of religious Orders who are keen to communicate the good attached to their charism. This participation is fostered in our Institute right from the start by means of Ascription.
The Rosminian vision could be summarised as follows: a) the Christian; b) Christian Associations; c) the person, the family, and civil society.
a) “The Word dwells in every disciples and there pours out his Spirit so that each one is a kind of centre and end of the whole, although he is also a member, more or less important, playing a more or less important role, of the Body of which Christ is the head. Each, therefore, possesses his own light of truth and each has his own fire of charity. Even the least of Christians who remains in a state of grace has it” (ibid. 108).
b) “As a result, each one adheres ever more closely to the great, essential and fundamental association, which is the Church, and has within himself the principle of, and inclination to, other charitable associations. He is drawn to them in the degree in which he co-operates with charity, and charity itself, through external cognitions and gifts, unfolds in him. This explains all those religious associations which aim to practise charity and beneficence to their neighbour with greater, more extensive and more organised zeal.
These associations, clearly, are merely shoots of truth and charity, the burgeoning of ever-productive roots, the natural and inevitable results of the School of God, the teacher and redeemer of mankind. This School is his Church. Charity can clearly be exercised by any
individual but is more productive when undertaken by a group of associated individuals working together in harmony like a kind of peace-loving, well organised, well informed and disciplined army engaged in the same campaign. Indeed, anyone who loves something, loves it in its entirety, not in part. So, as the truth to which I am referring has no limits, charity is by its very nature infinite and can never say “Enough” without self-contradiction. It reaches out for the heights in order to do as much good as it can.
Charity is love whereby we forget ourselves in favour of our fellows and seek no pleasure other than that of procuring their total well-being, by undertaking any study, toil and suffering for the sake of their physical, intellectual and moral good. Physical and intellectual good, however, are related to moral good, which is the end of the others. These three supreme genera of charity, when carefully considered, recall the three forms of being, real, ideal and moral and they belong to the three supreme categories which reassume all that the mind can conceive. These three categories are founded on the three primal forms of being. It is thus obvious that the final aim of charity is to enable all to share to the utmost degree in being, and in all three forms of being” (Ibid. 108).
c) “Charity, therefore, is exercised by the disciples either as individuals or as united in societies. It is also exercised on behalf of individuals and societies, although its ultimate human term is always the individual. Societies are means and not ends; they cannot have any end other than the good of their associated individuals, or other individuals. Thus, charity contains the immortal principle of the restoration and reform not only of the Church, but of domestic society, and of civil society. It follows also that family and nation share in that immortality which Christian wisdom transmits to everything it touches” (Ibid. 109).
Charity, however, does not terminate in man but in God. It loves human beings either because they share in the divine nature or because they are capable of sharing in it (Ibid. 110).
Prayer: “Father, I ask for your divine Son and for your Spirit” (2nd February 1851)
Section Three
The Institute, in its structure, follows the same structure and organisation of the Church. Each religious is “another Christ”. We would be contradicting the third Maxim, which is: “To direct all our thoughts and actions to the increase, and to the glory, of the Church of JESUS Christ” if we do not try to promote Vocations and Ascription. “Whatever we love, we love it in its entirety”, that is, we love it in all its parts, in an orderly way. The search for the means begins by using whatever we already have at our disposal. The Institute is a means for our sanctification, and Ascription is part of it.
The Ascribed are precious
It may be useful to reflect on some experiences, not to indulge in praising the past, but to show that if it was possible in the past to awaken the will to do good, it may be possible even now. We have had the gift of many Ascribed, mainly women, who have cultivated the Christian virtues and have worked with us in our pastoral activities. Their cultural and spiritual growth was favoured by regular meetings, and by lectures given by experts in Rosminian spirituality, open to other friends and sympathisers of surrounding areas. In some cases, participation was the result of a most generous and careful voluntary work.
We had the opportunity of being close to many Ascribed by participating in the monthly meetings of various groups. Among the most beautiful memories I treasure, I remember the participation in the Rosminian weeks in February, in preparation of the Feast of the Cell, and the seven year journey which ended with the Beatification of Rosmini. I remember one particular meeting in which the members worked harmoniously to distribute among themselves the various tasks of reaching out to many parishes. I enjoyed with great admiration their unity and efforts. I will always remember that half hour in which, by sharing their knowledge of people, and through their organisational skills, they managed to arrange a visit to each of the priests of the deanery sorting out all the details of the visits with great speed.
I will also mention the many generous donations to the Institute for the works of charity of the Provinces, donations which were the results of fund-raising events organised by the Ascribed, or of bequests. There are many proofs of the help given by the Ascribed to the religious of the Institute in the fields of temporal, intellectual and spiritual charity. Promotion of the Ascribed will mean multiplying the amount of charity, in all its forms, performed by the Institute.
During my visitations to our Communities, I always thank the Lord for the gift of the Ascribed, and find reasons for encouraging them to look to the future with renewed enthusiasm, both in the three older Provinces where the Ascribed have been present for many years, and in the Provinces recently constituted. I wish to express the gratitude and esteem of the Institute, and of myself included, to all the Ascribed, with the invitation to persevere and to attract others to the Ascription.
It could be useful to draw the attention to the Ascribed Angelina Lanza, as an example of a person who brought to the fore the value of Rosminian spirituality through Ascription. Her witness has been inserted in the great New Dictionary of Mystic Spirituality, as well as the witness of Blessed Rosmini. Her union with Christ, nourished by the constant reception of the Sacraments, opened her soul to all virtues and to unique spiritual experiences, lived in the normality of daily life. She was a woman of great learning, but she had to cope with the running of the family, with the anguish brought about by the death of her two young daughters, and with the difficulties caused by her agnostic husband. She was encouraged and guided by Fr
Giuseppe Bozzetti, who was her Spiritual director. She co-operated with Charitas, writing pages of great spiritual value; and she practised the “hidden virtues”, which include “to adore”, “to be silent”, and “to rejoice”.
Recommendations
It is my hope that I have managed to highlight the main points through which to reach a firm conviction about the “great good” which Ascription, including the Sodalities, can produce. If anyone has doubts, he would be doubting Rosmini’s words, not my words.
It is true that Ascription has been neglected at times. I too feel responsible for it. Moreover, it is only in recent years that the Sisters of Providence have been asked to look after the Ascribed. The Lord, however, has shown through many signs that we must spread His gifts more widely: “Freely you received, freely give” (Mt. 10, 8). His word lasts forever. The fire of charity “poured in our hearts” demands to be spread widely.
Our times do not seem favourable to a new spring of Ascription; this is not, however, a valid reason for giving up the effort. Let us be resilient in this important work!
We may be prompted into renewed action by the realisation that we can now avoid the mistakes and limitations which have weakened our commitment in the past. Experience teaches us to seek new ways, prophetically. It is a question of discerning wisely: “Do not quench the Spirit; do not despise prophetic utterances. But examine everything carefully; hold fast to that which is good” (1Tess. 5, 19-21).
Promotion of Vocations: to the Rosminians, the Rosminian Sisters, and to the Ascribed
There is an explicit invitation to dedicate our attention to this important aspect. The next Synod in Rome, already in preparation, for which the faithful have been invited to send in contributions, has as its theme: “Young people, faith and vocational discernment”. Let us think also of vocational discernment to Ascription.
Vocations are still to be found, even in Italy. We can direct our efforts to nurturing them, even if we are not able to gather them together in the near future. We can find the means, if we try. A portion of my time is dedicated to nurturing vocations, and to support those who are already on their journey.
I like to quote a passage written by Fr David Kinnear Glenday, who was General Superior of the Comboni Fathers, and who is now the secretary of the Union of General Superiors: “My desire to be a missionary priest has always been with me, I cannot remember a time when I was without it. At the age of 8, I discovered a local Catholic newspaper and I read the adverts about vocations. That same Sunday I wrote a letter to the Comboni Fathers and by Tuesday I received a reply from London, some 500 miles away. For a few years after, the Fathers travelled by car all the way from London to Dundee to be with me” (Viaggio nella Vita Religiosa, LEV. Riccardo Benotti).
Even those who are no longer young can attract others to the joy of the Gospel, which is always new. When we buy any product, we check the expiry date for safety, but for quality we check the date of the foundation of the Firm which makes the product. The older the Firm, the more we trust in its experience, reliability, and excellence! Let us not lose heart! The age of a person or of an Institute is a strong support, like the sturdy and well-rooted support is of help to the young vine. Let us not be robbed of the solidity of the Institute of Charity!
Our caring must be attentive and constant
How many vocations have been neglected in their care! One more fully alive Christian, religious, or religious sister, or Ascribed are like a diamond, a pearl of great value! It is worth spending effort and time for it. “We need to have the courage to sow the seed widely, in the heart of everyone, without preference or exceptions” (New Vocations for a new Europe, section IV, Pedagogy of Vocations, 1997)
“Let no one, through a fault of ours, ignore what he should know, in order to direct, for the better, his own life” (Ibid. Blessed Paul VI).
A Prayerful Conclusion
The posterity of the believer
God said to Abraham: “Look toward the heaven and count its stars, if you are able to count them; so shall your descendants be” (Gen. 15, 5)
Six Rosminian Stars
We often find, in our houses, the emblem of the pelican, which is the official emblem of the Institute, and the emblem of the Rosmini family. It has six golden stars shining brightly, and a motto which invites to look to the heavens: “In the darkness they shine”. God has granted Rosmini a six-fold spiritual posterity, which is constituted by all of us who belong to the Rosminian Family: presbyters, coadjutors, brothers, sisters, adoptive sons, ascribed. Let us be constant in praying for Rosminian vocations in the Church.
Six short prayers written by Rosmini: they invite us to be at all times “one body”
1. “Give me strength, O my God – Give them strength!” (13 October 1832)
2. “Make me in accord with all good persons: may we understand one another; may we meet one another in You; let our hearts be known in You, where they truly are” (12 November 1845)
3. “You have given me your words, make them fruitful in me and in all my brethren” (24 November 1845)
4. “May these be your servants, as you were the servant of the Father” (3 September 1846)
5. “Send us your heroes, O send us your heroes” (3 December 1846)
6. “Make me, O Lord, in accord with all those with whom you know that I am in accord” (13 December 1852)
Written in Rome on 220th Anniversary of the Baptism of Antonio Rosmini, and on 178th Anniversary of the first Professions and first Ascriptions.
Rome, 25th March 2017
Fr Vito Nardin
Provost General
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